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It’s been such a busy week that I forgot to post on release day!

This book combines characters from The Worthingtons and The Marriage Game.

The cover.

The Most Eligible Lord In London

 

The blurb:

In this captivating new Regency trilogy, bestselling author Ella Quinn picks up where her beloved Worthingtons series left off, as three Lords of London discover true love at last . . .

Handsome, rakish, incorrigibly flirtatious—Fredrick, Lord Littleton, is notorious. Lady Adeline Wivenly is resolved to keep him at arm’s length during her first Season—until she overhears another woman’s plot to trick him into marriage. Even a rogue is undeserving of such deception, and Adeline feels obliged to warn him—only to find herself perilously attracted . . .

In the past, Littleton’s charm nearly got him leg-shackled to the wrong woman. Now he’s positive he’s found the right one, for Adeline is everything he wants and needs in a wife. Her sense of justice is so strong she agrees to help him despite her mistrust. But can the ton’s most elusive lord convince the lady he is finally serious about marriage—as long as she will be his bride?

An excerpt:

Blast it all. Why had he decided to look for a wife in the first place? He should have just done what his father and every other Littleton had done for centuries: wait until he had to marry.

Pulling himself together, he rode onto the carriageway. Within a few seconds, he found himself being genially greeted by four matrons in a landau. The tension eased out of his shoulders. Perhaps it wouldn’t be as bad as he’d imagined.

“Lord Littleton—”Lady Wall wiggled her fingers at him—“I am glad to find you in Town.”

The lady next to her raised interested blue eyes to his, gave him a come-hither look, and said, “I do not believe we have been introduced.”

“Oh, my,” Lady Wall exclaimed. “It did not occur to me that you did not know his lordship. Allow me to make you known to Lord Littleton. My lord, this is Lady Holloway.”

“It is a pleasure to meet you, my lord.” Her generous lips rose in a smile.

In the past, he would have immediately returned her look for one of his own and made an arrangement to meet in a more secluded place. But his hunting instinct didn’t press him the way it used to. Perhaps that was the reason he’d decided to wed. He bowed. “The pleasure is mine.”

Lady Wall indicated the other two matrons in the carriage. “I trust you remember Lady Jersey and Lady Sefton?”

“Naturally.” Frits bowed again, and they exchanged greetings. “Ladies, I hope I find you in good health.”

“And you, my lord.” Lady Sefton inclined her head.

As the landau moved forward, Frits scanned the verge. He saw the one lady he had not wished to see, Lady Dorie Calthorp—daughter of the Marquis of Huntingdon, and his mistake—strolling with four other ladies. He’d behaved badly toward her last Season. Though not on purpose. For too long, he thought they would be a good match. But the more he grew to know her and her strengths and desires for her life, the more he was convinced marrying her would be a horrible mistake. But instead of finding a way to tell her, he’d fled London and returned to Littlewood, his main estate. And now it was too late to attempt to explain his panic. If he’d even had the words.

After taking a breath, he let it out slowly. He might as well get this over with. Frits just hoped she didn’t give him the cut direct.

Riding over to the group, he gave her his friendly smile. “Lady Dorie, well-met.”

The smile she returned was strained, and her eyes were hard. “Lord Littleton, I did not know you were in Town.”

“I arrived yesterday.” If looks could kill, he’d be lying on the ground bleeding. “Have you been in Town long?”

“Long enough.” Her words were clipped. She turned to the other ladies and made an elegant gesture toward him. “On the subject of gentlemen who appear eligible and are not, permit me to introduce to you Lord Littleton.” Damn and blast it. He fought to maintain his amiable countenance. She was obviously going to do her best to ensure he didn’t have an easy time finding a wife. “My lord, Lady Adeline Wivenly, Lady Augusta Vivers, Miss Featherton, and Miss Stern.”

He forced a smile and made what he knew was a stylish bow. “Ladies, it is a pleasure to meet you. I hope you enjoy your time in the metropolis.” Miss Stern gave him a hard look. Had Lady Dorie already blackened his name to her friend? Lady Augusta was polite but unaffected, as if she did not care one way or the other if she met him. Miss Featherton had narrowed her eyes as if assessing his worth as a human being. That was disconcerting, but it ran in her family. He knew her older brother and sister.

Then there was Lady Adeline. She just stared at him with considering, soft, gray eyes that shone like silver. Curls of gleaming, dark, honey-blond hair framed her face. She was utterly entrancing. Immediately, he wanted to know what she was thinking. As if she realized she should not continue to look at him, she dropped her gaze, and thick, brown lashes fluttered to her cheeks, drawing his attention to her straight, little nose and a light sprinkling of freckles. If only he’d met her in other company. Naturally, he could not help but notice her deep, rose lips and the fact that her bottom lip was just a bit plumper than the top one. His gaze dropped lower, and he sucked in a breath. Even her demure spencer couldn’t hide the bounty beneath. He could have licked his lips at the thought of her in an evening gown. Here was a lady worth getting to know.

Buy links.

Amazon US https://amzn.to/31ZVGWS

Amazon UK https://amzn.to/2XtWS5c

Amazon CA https://amzn.to/2x9wcYC

Amazon Germany https://amzn.to/2FpphPG

Google Play http://bit.ly/2utSE0Q

B&N http://bit.ly/2XBP7KR

BAM http://bit.ly/2TTxbsD

Kobo http://bit.ly/2RmDKCp

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Get together 1

A little while ago I posted about the word picnic. Well, yesterday I was writing along and decided I really should look up the term ‘get together.’ I’ve know I’ve used it before, but for some strange reason I never checked it for accuracy. You can imagine my dismay when I discovered that as an adjective or a noun there was no recorded usage before 1898 and it was a US term.

From the OED: colloquial (originally U.S.).

  1. adj. noun

Of a social function: that enables people to get together, esp. informally. Also (of attitudes, etc.): favouring social interaction and cooperation.

1898   Congregationalist(Boston, Mass.)  29 Dec. 982/1  The Get-Together Club is not really an organization; it simply gets together, eats, and talks. Some listen.

Ergo, I immediately clicked the thesauruses and found two synonyms. The first is

1761 ‘free and easy’ an informal gathering for singing or similar entertainment, at which drinking and smoking are also permitted; a smoking concert.

I found this interesting, but it didn’t match the type of entertainment I envisioned.

The second term was sans souci1781 lit. without care or concern also, †a free-and-easy social gathering.

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #HistoricalFiction #RegencyRomance

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Greetings 1

Hello is ubiquitous and has become a common greeting in many countries in the world. Even in Germany, it’s become an excepted greeting when meeting another person. However, the more traditional greetings are still expected when meeting someone for the first time or when entering a small place of business or a restaurant. It was not, however, used as greeting during the Regency. I researched all of Jane Austen’s books, did a search on Google Advanced Book Search and found no reference to it at all. Then looked it up in the Oxford English Dictionary OED).

According to the OED, hello as a term to get someone’s attention or register surprise has been used since around the 1820’s in North America. There are no British references.

Hello as a greeting was first recorded in the US in the US Yankee Clipper in 1853.

It does not appear to have been in common use in Britain until around the 1920’s. The first recorded usage was by P. G. Wodehouse’s Money for Nothing iv. 76   ‘Hello, sweetie-pie,’ said Miss Molloy in 1928. Wodehouse, as some of you might know, was a widely read contemporary English writer. We generally believe that spoken usage preceded written usage by about ten years. That still does not take us back to the Regency.

So what did they say? They would have used the greetings we all used before “hello” wiggled it’s way into almost universal parlance. Good morning, good afternoon, good day, good evening. When meeting by chance, “well met” is fine.

Let me know what other greetings you think of.

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During the Regency towels were either linen, cotton, or flannel. The weaving technique was first developed in France in 1841. This video shows how terry cloth was first woven: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2d5gwvUzAlI At the time it was used for clothing.

The technique was used on cotton in 1848, and in 1850 an industrial method for weaving terry cloth was developed. Once terry cloth was machine made, it began to be sold to be sold in lengths as toweling, and as pre-made towels. The industrial process made terry cloths affordable.

I haven’t been able to find anything concerning when fluffy towels were first made. From my own memory, I think it was sometime in the later part of the 20th century.

My thanks to Doreen for this idea.

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalFiction #RegencyRomance #HistoricalRomance

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During the Regency as well as today the words university and college are not interchangeable. In England college comes before university. For example, Eton College is the equivalent of US and Canadian high school. A university a place of higher education such as Oxford and Cambridge. This is true in Europe as well.

Although it’s customary now for students at university to graduate with degrees, during the Regency that was not necessarily the case. In only a few areas, legal studies (to be a barrister) and studies for the clergy required that one completed a course of study. Most young gentlemen went to university to make contacts and have fun.

The first two images are of Eton. The second two are of Oxford.

 

EtonEton 2

oxfordOxford2

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The Lords
I’ve gotten to a part in the book I’m writing (The Most Eligible Bride in London) where I needed to know whether the Lords has assigned seating. Well, I never did find the answer on Google, but I did find this which I thought might interest you.

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No matter what you think about homosexuality, most of us know how draconian the laws were during the Regency. So, imagine not only my amazement, but those of others, to find a journal written by a farmer (a gentleman farmer perhaps) concerning his thoughts on homosexuality. It gives us reason to believe that it was not as universally condemned as we had thought. Or at least not in all circles. Around the same time a Navy physical was caught engaging in sex with a man and was hung.
 
#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #RegecyRomance

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