Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Regency’ Category

Al Fresco

Much to my dismay, picnics as we know them did not seem to exist until the middle part of the 19th century. In fact, a picnic during the Regency was what we would call a pot-luck, where everyone contributes food. That does not mean they didn’t go outside, sit on a blanket, and eat. But it was called al fresco dining which could mean anything from an elaborate table set up to a blanket on the ground.

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #RegencyRomance

Read Full Post »

Biscuits and tea
In the UK, and many other countries, a biscuit is and has always been the equivalent of a US (may Canadian) cookie. Biscuits as we in the US know them, made with flour, milk, eggs, and a leavening were not around until the mid-19th century when baking powder and baking soda were invented.
Biscuits 1biscuits 2
 
#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #RegencyRomance

Read Full Post »

Despite the name, gentlemen farmers were not gentry and, thus, not gentlemen. The difference lies in how the land is used. Although, their holdings could be quite large, they were men who farmed their own land. Whereas, the gentry had tenants who, via leases, farmed the land for them. Gentlemen farmers had the same status as merchants, what we would call the middle-class no matter how wealthy they became.

farming

Read Full Post »

Sisters

This was not really as difficult as some might think. Any lady whose father is a viscount or lower is called “miss”. However, each lady is part of an order. Let’s take the case of Viscount Featherton and his three daughters. The first daughter, Meg, is properly called Miss Featherton. Now, what if Miss Featherton doesn’t take her first Season, or just doesn’t like any of her options, and her sister, Adeline, comes out. When they are introduced they are Miss Featherton and Miss Adeline Featherton. Adeline is properly called Miss Adeline, but never Miss Featherton. But once Meg is married Adeline becomes Miss Featherton. It’s the same when the third daughter, Miss Sarah Featherton comes out. If all three ladies are out at the same time they are Miss Featherton, Miss Adeline, and Miss Sarah.

sisters 2

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #RegencyRomance

Read Full Post »

The ability to serve tea gracefully was an important skill for young ladies to learn. Ladies were also encouraged to find their own blend of tea, and tea shops made it easy for a lady to try different blends. We can debate whether milk or cream was used. For whatever it’s worth, there are several accounts of gentlemen using cream. Jane Austen used milk. Most tea drinkers (like me) shudder at the mention of cream in tea. And there is still an ongoing debate over whether or not the milk goes in the cup first. Some recent discussion concluded that it depended on the quality of the porcelain of the tea cup. The better quality porcelains were able to take the heat of the tea.

If a house had male servants (butler or footmen) they would bring the tea tray to the lady of the house, not a regular maid or the housekeeper. This was especially true if the lady had guests. The lady, not the servant, would serve the tea to her guests.

#RegencyTrivia #RegencyRomance #HistoricalRomance

Read Full Post »

kipferl

Baking powder was invented in 1843, and baking powder followed in 1846. What does this mean for the Regency? That all breads and pastries had to be leavened with yeast.

Chiefs attempted all sorts of different ingredients as leavenings. Pearl ash was one such ingredient. However, the results were uneven. Another way to getting a fluffy texture was by beating eggs or egg whites for an hour.

Scones, as we know them, had not yet been invented. Nor did all the lovely pastries and quick breads exist. If one had visited Vienna, one could have tasted a kipferl, which is the predecessor of the croissant. The technique to make the pastry light is by layering dough and butter. However, they remained in Austria until the 1830s when two enterprising Austrian bakers opened up an Austrian bakery in Paris. Kipferls as still consumed in the morning in Austria. They are not sweet like croissants, but still very tasty.

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #RegencyRomance

Read Full Post »

Many of us grew up watching Westerns where people (mostly men) rode their horses everywhere, and when they got where they were going in the town hitched them up to hitching post and went about their business. I should point out that I never actually saw any of the Westerns take place in a large city. But I digress.

What we remember from Westerns is not applicable to London or, I daresay, any other large English city and probably not very many towns or villages. First of all, there were no horse hitches standing around outside of stores on Bond or Bruton Streets, or outside of any of the gentlemen’s clubs. Secondly, no gentleman would generally go into a club smelling like a horse. Horses in Town (as it was referred to) were relegated to riding in the Park or possibly riding out to Richmond (for gentlemen as ladies did not ride horses on large public roads). In towns and villages horses would be left at an inn where they could be taken care of until the rider(s) returned from going about their business. In the country people might probably did visit neighbors on horseback, but they would never arrive for dinner on a horse. That is not only because of the smell, but because boots were not worn in the evenings. Proper evening attire required evening shoes (pumps).

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: