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Posts Tagged ‘#historicalromance’

We rarely mention the 1830’s gowns. So, while I was researching something else (the story of my life) I found a few videos on 1830s gowns and other things. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrX2Qsyy77Q

#RegencyRomance #HistoricalFiction #Regency #ReadaRegency1820s 1

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It’s finally release day for Believe in Me!

Believe In Me 1800x2700

Marriage has worked out quite nicely for her older sisters, yet Lady Augusta Vivers is certain it would end her studies in languages and geography, and stop her from travelling. But when her mother thwarts her plan to attend the only university in Europe that accepts women—in Italy—she is forced to agree to one London Season. Spending her time at parties proves an empty diversion—until she encounters the well-traveled Lord Phineas Carter-Wood. Still, Europe awaits . . .

Phineas has studied architecture all over the world, yet Augusta is his most intriguing discovery yet. How can he resist a woman who loves maps and far-off lands? But her longing for all things foreign hinders any hope of courtship. When he learns her cousins have offered a trip to Europe, he secretly arranges to join their party. For he is determined to show Augusta that a real union is a thrilling adventure of its own. And when their journey is beset by dangerous obstacles, he gets far more opportunity than he bargained for . . .

Amazon https://amzn.to/2kBb73b

B&N http://bit.ly/2HUgIuC

BAM http://bit.ly/2HVvHEG

Google Play http://bit.ly/2lfQCJQ

Kobo http://bit.ly/2sjC2VE

iBooks https://apple.co/2xtw0GN

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During Regency dancing was an extremely important skill to have. Everyone from the very poor to the very rich learned to dance. The only differences were the types of dances, the way they were preformed, and where they were held.

Boys began learning to dance at young children, about the age of five or six. The same time girls started. As the dances became more complicated—and they were during the Regency—young men had dancing instructors to teach them the steps and refine their skills. There were even children’s “balls” where they could practice.

Two resources are “The Complete System of English Country Dancing,” by Mr. Wilson, a dancing master of the time, and “A Dance with Jane Austen: How a Novelist and Her Characters Went to the Ball” by Susannah Fullerton

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#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #Regency #ReadaRegency

 

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Marriage was a truly life changing event for a lady during the Regency. Here are at least some of the ways life changed.

When you went for a walk you could go with just a friend, or even a gentleman who was not your husband without benefit of a maid or footman. Although, going alone in London, even Mayfair, was not well advised.

You were allowed in a closed coach alone, with a coachman with a gentleman who was not your husband or close relative.

You could wear any color you wanted.

You did not have to dance with a man just because he asked you to dance.

You could have a gentleman escort you to a ball or other event, and he didn’t have to be your husband or a close relative.

You were privy to scandalous conversations the other matrons and widows were having.

You could take a lover (although, most husbands like discretion).

You could spend time in the card room.

You could speak with a gentleman without a “proper” introduction.

You were no longer asked to show your proficiency on a musical instrument.

Unless your husband was really unreasonable, no one read your correspondence.

You were in charge of your own household and household staff (except for the butler who always worked for the master if there was one)

You could hire your own lady’s maid if you didn’t like the one your mother selected for you.

Matrons 1matrons 2matrons 4

 

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #ReadaRegency #Historical

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This video is mostly accurate as it pertains to dressing during the Regency. The one part that stands out as inaccurate is the term palettes for drawers. The OED dates the US word to 1843. One almost must remember that Mary Shelley was a scandalous young woman.
 

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When this question was asked I thought I’d addressed the subject previously, but apparently not. During the Regency, a child was a child of the marriage as long the child was born during the marriage, and the husband did not disclaim it. That is to say the child was the husband’s lawful and legitimate child—also known in the case of sons—as the heir of his body. It wasn’t until the late 1980’s that a man could dispute the legitimacy of a child born during the marriage, and it wasn’t until the 1990s that the biological father of the child could make a legal claim to be recognized as the child’s father when the mother was married to another man at the time of the child’s birth. All of this very helpfully came about as DNA started to be used in the courts to determine paternity. Although, DNA had been around since the 1960s, courts are notoriously slow to recognize new scientific methods.

Babiesfamily

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #ReadaRegency #

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I am going to assume this question is in regards to an unmarried lady who is not betrothed to the gentleman. This is probably not a complete list, but here goes:

A lady cannot be alone with a gentleman who is not either a very close relative (father, grandfather, brother, uncle) or guardian in a closed room or a closed carriage, or a carriage that either the lady or the gentleman is not driving.

A lady must have a chaperone of some sort (friend, maid, footman) when she is walking with a gentleman.

A lady may not speak with a gentleman if he has not been properly introduced to her.

A lady who must accept a dance offer from a gentleman if she has an open set left. If she does not, she cannot dance that set with another gentleman. Unless, of course, a gentleman strolls up and says, “My dance I believe.” Thus saving her from the man she doesn’t wish to stand up with.

A lady may not dance more than twice in one evening with a gentleman. This could get interesting as there could be as many as four entertainments in one evening.

A lady may ride in a sporting carriage with a gentleman without a chaperone to some place like the Park. She may not take off to Richmond (for example) alone with him.

She must have a groom with her when she goes horseback riding with a gentleman.

A lady may not accept jewelry or clothing from a gentleman. She may accept trifles such as flowers, poems, a fan, etc.

at a ballridingDancing 2

 

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #ReadaRegency

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