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Posts Tagged ‘#RegencyTrivia’

Proposal

During the Regency once a gentleman asked for a lady’s hand and she accepted, he was stuck. There was no way he could honorably jilt her without ruining her reputation. Why? Because if he broke the engagement, it was presumed that she was not of good character.

The lady, however, could break a betrothal for any number of reasons without ruining either of their reputations. The main reason used was that she discovered they would not suit. The only time jilting a gentleman could cause a scandal is if it happened very close to the wedding date. Still, that wouldn’t last long.

There have been some very funny scenes in books that revolve around gentlemen attempting to convince a lady to break a betrothal. Two that come immediately to mind are The Grand Sophy and The Bath Tangle, both by the great Georgette Heyer.

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #ReadaRegency #GeorgetteHeyer

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Barouche carriages were known for their elegance and expense. These four-wheeled vehicles had a cabriolet top light construction. They were only suitable for good weather in the spring, summer, and early autumn. The carriage was built to be driven by a coachman. As you can see from the images, the sides were low enabling the inhabitants to see and be seen.

Barouche 1

 

barouche 2

 

 

 

The barouche was generally used in Town. If driven in the country the roads would have to be very good.

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #ReadaRegency

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The Landau

A Landau was an elegant carriage used mostly by those who liked to ride with friends and wanted to be seen. The carriage had low sides for visibility (of the passengers) and often had a convertible top. They were driven by a coachman and powered by a pair, or a team of four horses. Landaus were typically quite elegant. A description of one is below.

Landau’s were popular during the Grand Strut in the Park (Hyde Park). The earliest mention of a landau was in the late 18th century.

morning-post-landau

Landau 2

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #Historical

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I came across this post by Geri Walton on coach building that I thought might interest you.
 
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For those who didn’t need the space of a traveling coach, there was the travelling chariot. What was the difference between a chariot and a coach? The size and weight. A chariot was made for one or, at the most two people traveling. For distances, it would be pulled by a team of four horses. Otherwise, it could be pulled by a pair.

An unmarried lady would not be able to ride in a chariot with a gentleman who was not her brother, father, uncle, or guardian.

Travelling chariot 2 - Red House Stables

Inside a travelling chariot 2 - Red House Stables

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Regency Trivia – Coaches
 
Traveling Coaches
 
Of all the privately owned coaches and carriages these were the largest. Bear in mind that every coach was bespoke. There are accounts of traveling coaches having seats that made in to beds, built in shelves and tables, hidden compartments, holders for hot bricks in the floor, and storage under the seats, just to name a few amenities.
 
A traveling coach was driven by a coachman and would have been powered by a team of four or six horses. If the owner made frequent trips to the same places, they’d post horses along the route in order to ensure they wouldn’t be held up waiting for replacements.
 
The body of the coach was large and enclosed. Glass windows were generally set in the doors and sides of the coach and covered with either leather or cloth shades or curtains. Velvet was a common covering for the benches and cushions, although, leather was also used.
 
Ladies or the most ranking person was seated in the forward facing seat. Gentlemen or lesser ranking persons sat in the backward facing seat. An unmarried lady could not ride alone in a coach with a gentleman who wasn’t either her guardian or a close (brother, father, uncle, grandfather) relative without courting ruin. However, a betrothed lady could ride in one alone with her betrothed for very short distances.
 
If the owner was a peer or a widow of a peer, a crest would be drawn out on the side panels, generally in gold.
Some of these photos are from coaches that were slightly later than the Regency, but the’ll give you and idea.
 
Traveling coach Duke of Northumberland
Traveling coach
coach bed
#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #ReadaRegency

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As you can imagine, county carriages served a different purpose than Town carriages. Serviceability on country roads and lanes was more important than looks. Although, that doesn’t mean one would necessarily give up style completely.

One of the more popular carriages was the gig, a two wheeled vehicle drawn by one horse. The seat rose above the wheels and was wide enough for two people. They were also fitted with a small platform on the back, presumably to carry purchases made in a village or other items. Gigs could also be fitted with thick panes oil lamps known as “gig lamps” for nighttime travel.

Gig

Gig 2

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