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Archive for May, 2019

Believe In Me 1800x2700
Believe in Me is .99 until May 13th!!
 
Marriage has worked out quite nicely for her older sisters, yet Lady Augusta Vivers is certain it would end her studies in languages and geography, and stop her from travelling. But when her mother thwarts her plan to attend the only university in Europe that accepts women—in Italy—she is forced to agree to one London Season. Spending her time at parties proves an empty diversion—until she encounters the well-traveled Lord Phineas Carter-Wood. Still, Europe awaits . . .
 
Phineas has studied architecture all over the world, yet Augusta is his most intriguing discovery yet. How can he resist a woman who loves maps and far-off lands? But her longing for all things foreign hinders any hope of courtship. When he learns her cousins have offered a trip to Europe, he secretly arranges to join their party. For he is determined to show Augusta that a real union is a thrilling adventure of its own. And when their journey is beset by dangerous obstacles, he gets far more opportunity than he bargained for . . .
 
 
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This is from a combination of questions I received from you about how ladies and their hair.

Although the style of the time was “natural” that has to be put into context. It really meant not wearing wigs and power in their hair. Ladies who were not blessed with an abundance of thick easily styled hair could use hair pieces and pads.

Hair pieces could be in the form of ringlets, braids, or a piece large enough to be added to the hair and styled in. These hair pieces were made of real human hair. Pads were used to give the hair a puffier look. Although we don’t see them much, there were short hair styles and styles that did not require curls.

To achieve curls, one used a hair curler heated in a fire place, or one could use paper wrapped around the hair and pinned in place.

A lady’s maid styled the lady’s hair. She could also trim and cut hair. I read once in a Georgette Heyer book that there were male hair stylists that would cut hair to the latest style, but I can’t find anything to support that. Heyer was almost always right, but she did put falsities in her books because she was being plagiarized and those occasional false things would help prove that she was.

Regency Hair style 1Regency Hair style 2Regency Hair style 3

#RegencyTrivia #HistoricalRomance #RegencyRomance #ReadaRegency

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